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Full text of "The manufacture and properties of iron and steel"

INFLUENCE OP HOT WOBKING ON STEEL.
from the standard, and note the corresponding ductility. In the first division, for example, it was found that the average increase in strength from the preliminary har to the finished plate was 7500 pounds per square inch. Consequently this figure was taken as a dividing line, and a comparison was made of the heats showing more than this difference with those showing less. The same rule was followed in all the other divisions.                        ;
Table XIV-L gives a different view of the same data, the groups being divided on the less logical but more practical basis of the
TABLE XIV-M.                    •
Comparative Physical Properties of Angles and Sheared Plates, both being made from Pennsylvania Steel Company Steel.
		. .	d	..	..'		if*	
	<H O	o t	1-	|*|	1*1	_o -t> .	0 <n	'o'o
	n 1) tiro	<H o		S-Sg	7v§2-	2d eg	33 ®	•2ft
	isl	•d • a	°*	4i O CF	|gg,		S-Sl	a «
	#£>•»		o d	I-H  ft tfl	f— ' AoD	r% P<	^00 V	® oi
	H		'A	P	fa	H	W	«
		Angles	82	52533	86284	69.07	82.18	63.7
Basic open-hearth soft steel,	A  o |	Plates	107	54998	88017	69.12	29.28	68.6
phorus.		Angles	20	58171	84891	65.62	82^8	62.3
	T« to 4	Plates	102	55017	84947	68.52	29.03	61^
Basic open-hearth medium steel, below .04 per cent, in phosphorus.	A tof	Angles Plates	64 265	58865 58271	89692 40349	67.48 69.24	80^2 28.27	58.8 58.1
		Angles	212	60845	40891	67.21	29.35	67.4
	A  o t	Plates	190	60217	43278	71.87	26.98	67.4
Acid open-hearth soft steel, below .08 per cent, in phosphorus.	T8 ^0 J	Angles Plates	126 69	60695 60768	89415 89061	64.94 64.28	29.28 25.87	65.6 65.1
		Angles	81	60558	88645	63.81	28.95	53.8
	1%   ° i	Plates	18	60666	87982	62^3	24.67	62.7
strength of the finished plate. It will be seen that the elongation for a given tensile strength is not seriously affected by the variations in rolling, but that the hotter finished plates are somewhat better. The elastic ratio exhibits much less variation than would be expected, and this might throw some doubt on the results, but all the different groups teach the same lesson, and in some of them the number of heats is so large as to give great weight to the conclusion. The plates were all rolled from slabs, which in turn had been rolled from large ingots, so that there was ample work on all thicknesses.
SEC.  XIVj.—Comparative physical properties of plates and